Los Angeles Art Gallery Tours

Illuminating the Los Angeles Art Scene

Kristin Calabrese, Sabotage Bitch, 2011, oil and acrylic on canvas, 102 x 78 inches

Kristin Calabrese, Sabotage Bitch, 2011, oil and acrylic on canvas, 102 x 78 inches

Susanne Vielmetter’s Gallery in Culver City actually has three separate solo shows up this month (Kristin Calabrese, Monique van Genderen and Mindy Shapero) and all are worth a visit, but Calabrese’s paintings particularly resonated with me this afternoon.

Her show, entitled “Back of My Face,” is described by the artist a direct expression of her emotional life rendered as objects. And, the most interesting paintings in her show begin to take on the role of fragments of her personality as both a human being and as an ambitious, engaged artist.

The first painting one encounters in the show, Sabotage Bitch, pictured above, seems to be a representation of several things: most obviously, the sort of ugly, petty emotions one might quietly harbor, but never reveal.

More interestingly, the piece itself has the cool appearance of the sort of coy artwork that might be more than completely at home, but only mildly remarkable in any generic high-stakes international contemporary art fair context. And, since Calabrese is mostly known for her highly refined realistic painting chops, which the rest of the show ably demonstrates, the piece feels like a strange, out of place anomaly. Take a look at the painting’s materials and its combination of (water-based) acrylic and oil paint might suggest that the piece is, in a sense, “sabotaging” itself by means of mixing materials that can’t be used together without soon peeling.

OOPS… as I now understand it – “(Sabotage Bitch) is an acrylic ground with oil on top – similar to most oil paintings with a gesso ground – so it’s archival and won’t peel.” (Thanks for the correction, Kristin!)

Kristin Calabrese, Art as Bandaid, 2011, oil on linen, 84 x 84 inches

Kristin Calabrese, Art as Bandaid, 2011, oil on linen, 84 x 84 inches

Another piece, Art as Bandaid, has a title alluding to the therapeutic value of art, or perhaps the way that surfaces can be used to conceal problems. From afar, the painting is a giant, pleasantly-textured, tastefully minimal dot. Look closely, and it seems to be entirely comprised of bandaids. Look even closer and the bandaids prove to be a zillion realistically-painted bandaids.

The tedium and concentration that must have gone into this painting’s making either belies the conceit of painting as therapeutic or suggests that it could only have been made by a person who finds such an activity meditative – or maybe both.

Kristin Calabrese, Art as Bandaid (detail), 2011, oil on linen, 84 x 84 inches

Kristin Calabrese, Art as Bandaid (detail), 2011, oil on linen, 84 x 84 inches

Kristin Calabrese, Blending In, 2011, oil on canvas, 96 x 48 inches

Kristin Calabrese, Blending In, 2011, oil on canvas, 96 x 48 inches

The most daring piece in the show is Blending In, which portrays the artist as a self-conscious buffoon, covered with scrutinizing eyes. The piece joyously speaks to the sorry recognition that public sincerity risks public ridicule .


4 Responses to “Kristin Calabrese at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects”

  1. Sally Jones says:

    The painting with words is an acrylic ground with oil on top – similar to most oil paintings with a gesso ground – so it’s archival and won’t peel.

    • Bill says:

      Thanks for the info, Kristin(AKA Sally)! I’m very sorry to publicly proclaim that Sabotage Bitch wouldn’t hold up over time.

      Sometimes I find meaning beyond the usual boundaries of where it might otherwise be intended to reside.

      In my own defense, every piece in your current show seemed to refer back to itself in some way – with hard-won form, labor and craftsmanship intentionally interacting with the takeaway content. The leaning broom painting, the faux sheet of plywood, the ripped drop-cloth curtain and the spaghetti head piece tied all that up pretty cleanly and neatly. But, the pieces I referenced in my article extended their meaning well beyond their surface, which led me to consider the possibility that other aspects of their fabrication, as well as their relationships with one another, might also play a part in the overall takeaway of your show.

      In particular, the painstaking handiwork of the almost unbearably awkward and self-conscious Blending In seemed to be in intentional contrast to the quick and cool Sabotage Bitch. And since they are, in a sense, facing off and activating the gallery space that lies between them – I thought it completely reasonable that one of the paintings was hard-wired to slowly self-destruct.

      Anyway, I apologize that I got a little carried away.

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